2021 Federal Candidates on the Environment


HACEN'S SURVEY OF HALTON'S FEDERAL CANDIDATES


Question One:

Because of the urgent need to transfer from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy,

Are you in favour of ending all subsidies to carbon energy producing companies for the purposes of exploration, extraction and development?

Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Party

Yes. While the Green Party believes in a just transition, our ultimate goal is to end subsidies for fossil fuel companies, particularly starting with the fracking industry, which we are the only party to demand a national ban on.

Emily Brown; Conservative Party

Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

Yes, the NDP is committed to ending all subsidies to the fossil fuel industry and personally I think it should have happened years ago

Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam VanKoeverden; Liberal Party

Yes, for the purposes of exploration, extraction and development, I am in favour of ending all subsidies to carbon energy producing companies. I am in favour of eliminating subsidies and public financing for fossil fuel. A re-elected Liberal government will accelerate our G20 commitment to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies from 2025 to 2023 as well as develop a plan to phase-out public financing of the fossil fuel sector, including from Crown corporations, consistent with our commitment to reach net-zero emissions by 2050.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

Yes - I (and the federal NDP) support an end to all of the oil and gas subsidies that the Liberals and Conservatives have supported for decades. Climate Science is clear - supporting the industry that drives a majority of today’s pollution and climate change is entirely counter-productive to creating a sustainable future for the next generation of Canadians. The 18 Billion dollars that the Liberals have used to support the Oil and Gas Industry in 2020 alone could have been used to fund more efficient and productive plans, such as the NDP’s plan to invest in clean technologies, eco-friendly building retrofitting, and other low carbon initiatives. This is not even touching on all of the federal funds that were spent supporting the Kinder Morgan pipeline. It is time to stop holding on to the past, and to invest in the technologies and industries of the future.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

Yes


Oakville-North Burlington

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. Myself and the NDP are unequivocally in favour of ending all fossil fuel subsidies and redirecting these funds to low-carbon initiatives, thereby fulfilling our G-20 commitment. Additionally, we will ensure that future governments cannot reverse this by putting in place legislation to ban any future oil, gas, and pipeline subsidies.

Pam Damoff; Liberal

The Liberal Government committed to eliminating inefficient fossil fuel subsidies by 2025 and is on track to do so. We have already phased out eight corporate income tax breaks for the fossil fuel sector. This is in addition to the world-leading price on carbon pollution we put in place that will drive down emissions. It is important to note that are measures that are sometimes described as fossil fuel subsidies, but they are actually socially or environmentally focused initiatives. Some, in fact, are key parts of an effective climate plan and are intended to reduce emissions. For example, we invested $1.7 billion for orphan and inactive wells clean-up. This funding will address environmental liabilities from inactive oil and gas wells while supporting thousands of good jobs toward a cleaner Canada. For example, we invested $2.37 million for a diesel generating station in Nibinamik First Nation, a remote First Nation dependent on diesel for their energy needs. These programs will help contribute to our goal of reducing carbon emissions.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

As we move to Net-Zero, I agree that inefficient fossil fuel subsidies need to be phased out, and in fact, the Liberal Party has made international commitments to do so by 2025. We’ve also eliminated some corporate income tax breaks aimed at the fossil fuel sector, and are working on a plan to phase out public financing of the sector, including from Crown corporations.

On the other hand, we introduced a price on carbon, and rebated the proceeds back into Canadians’ pockets. These approaches combine to make cleaner, greener fuels and technologies more competitive relative to fossil fuels.

Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party

Question Two:

Because of the large scale of the transformation from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy,

Are you in favour of bringing in into being new government corporations and institutions, along with leveraging existing institutions, to strongly promote the necessary changes and developments?


Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Partyes, within context. I support and back government actions and institutions and the most effective way to combat large, national projects, and climate change definitely qualifies

Emily Brown; Conservative Party

Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

Yes, the NDP is committed to ending all subsidies to the fossil fuel industry and personally I think it should have happened years ago

Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam VanKoeverden; Liberal Party

Yes, it will be a large-scale effort, fully transferring to a renewable-energy economy, but a re-elected Liberal government is up for the job. We will start by creating green jobs in communities across Canada and across sectors to get to net-zero by 2050. Our plan prioritizes clean and renewable power from coast to coast to coast. To accomplish these changes, we will rapidly fund clean technology, this includes supporting sectors such as renewable energy, precision agriculture, and energy efficiency. As we move towards a net-zero future, it is estimated that the growth in clean energy jobs will help boost our economy and help Canada be a leader on the global stage.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

Of course - the NDP strongly supports the transformation and redirection of federal institutions and corporations to cater to the bold climate goals that our platform supports. Under an NDP government, all federal vehicle fleets will be made fully electric by 2025, all federal buildings will be run using clean energy, and procurement from clean energy Canadian companies will be made a priority. Not only this, but we support transparency for current private institutions and companies who are responsible for unacceptable amounts of pollution; mandatory transparency on carbon risk from all publicly traded private companies will be implemented to assure adherence to climate goals, and to encourage investment in clean energy companies/institutions.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

Yes. Indeed in the past we have advocated for an all-hands-on-deck approach in which a "war" cabinet, involving MPs from all parties, is formed to deal with the problem. 2030 is closer than we think.


Oakville-North Burlington

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. In order to promote the necessary changes and developments, we will leverage any existing government institutions necessary, whether this be to carry out our extensive green infrastructure investments, investments in transit and transportation across the country, accomplishing our clean energy revolution, or any of our other commitments.


We have also already committed to funding and creating the following new institutions or roles:

- A Climate Accountability Office, to provide independent oversight of federal climate progress, engage the public, and make recommendations on how to achieve our goals;

- A Climate Emergency Committee of Cabinet and a strong Climate Emergency Secretariat in the PMO to ensure a whole-of-government approach to responding to the climate emergency;

- Joint workplace environment committees to help reduce emissions at the source in every workplace;

- A Crown corporation to ensure the delivery of quality, affordable telecom services to every community to support more remote work, thereby reducing emissions from commuting

- A new Civilian Climate Corps to mobilize young people and create new jobs supporting conservation efforts and addressing the threat of climate change;

- A centre of excellence for research and development of zero-emissions vehicles to move forward related technologies such as hydrogen, batteries, and energy storage solutions;

- A new Canadian Climate Bank that will help boost investment in renewable energy, energy efficiency and low carbon technology across the country, provide support for interested provinces to inter-connect power grids and introduce smart grid technology, and support made-in-Canada manufacturing of renewable energy components and technologies.

- An Office of Environmental Justice to address the disproportionate impacts of pollution and loss of biodiversity on low-income, racialized and other marginalized communities


Pam Damoff; Liberal

Our government is committed to phasing out fossil fuels and achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. We agreed at the 2015 Paris climate talks to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. We have now delivered on our commitment to meet and exceed our old 2030 emissions reductions target – making us the first federal government in Canadian history to set a climate goal and meet it. We now set a new, more ambitious target to reduce emissions by 40- 45% below 2005 levels by 2030. We recognize that this goal will require a whole-of-government approach, along with collaboration from the provinces and territories, and Indigenous partners, to achieve it. If re-elected, we will also work to expand upon the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (PCF) to unite all levels of government, Indigenous Peoples, municipalities, private companies, academia, civil society, youth, and Canadians in a whole-of-society approach to climate change adaptation. In order to affect change, we need to provide opportunities for people to choose healthier options. That is why we are dedicated to improving and increasing active transportation options such as walking and cycling right here in Oakville North-Burlington, and have made historic investments in public transit.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

The price on carbon the Liberal Party introduced in 2016, with the proceeds being rebated back to Canadians, has made cleaner and greener fuels and technology more competitive and affordable, which has put Canada on an irreversible trajectory toward Net-Zero. We’ve also established a variety of direct funding programs that are designed to make it easier for Canadians to transition, such as $5,000 electric vehicle rebates and up to $5,000 for home energy retrofits.

Going forward, I support the Liberal Party’s plan to move toward mandatory climate-related financial disclosures and the development of net-zero plans for federally regulated sectors, including banks, pension funds, and government agencies.

We also plan to establish a $2 billion Futures Fund for Canada’s oil-producing provinces to help diversify their economies, which will include collaboration with workers, unions, environmental groups and investors, as well as Indigenous Peoples.


Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party


Question 3

Because the transformation from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy is central to the health, safety and prosperity of Canada and the world,

Are you in favour of legislating measures which provide both positive consequences for provinces, territories, municipalities, citizens and residents who support the necessary changes, and negative consequences for those who do not?

Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Party

Yes, though not to the level of individual citizens. The primary source of pollution is large industry, not individuals, and while our choices all contribute to climate change, systemic changes are needed far more than punitive measures on individuals.

Emily Brown; Conservative Party

Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

Yes, I believe the best way for the government to work is by thinking about the incentive structures they put into place through different legislation, taxes, subsidies, and whatnot. We need people to burn less carbon and the most likely way to work is by giving carrots to people who do good things and sticks to those who do bad ones.

Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam van Koeverden; Liberal Party

Federal, provincial, and territorial, and municipal governments need to work together to take actions that build on and complement existing climate plans, policies, programs, and regulations and reflect lessons learned from past experience. Since 2015, we have taken key actions to fight climate change with the cooperation of the provinces and territories. We have ensured a stable market transition to a low-carbon economy and worked with provinces and territories to tackle priority areas.

A re-elected Liberal government will continue to partner with the provinces and territories to develop a truly national net-zero power grid by 2035 that will secure affordable and efficient power for all Canadians as well as create good jobs. This will build on work we have already done to make clean power more readily available, including working with Atlantic Canada and Quebec on the Atlantic Loop, to improve how electricity is generated and moved within and between those provinces.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

Our focus is on creating strict guidelines for the large private sector polluters that drive a majority of the factors that lead to climate change; of course, this involves both incentivization for the use of clean energies and green transitions, as well as punishment for those who continue to create pollution and rely on carbon-heavy means of production. Additionally, all crown corporations and institutions within the federal government's domain would be forced to strictly adhere to climate guidelines set out by a federal NDP government. This involves strict rules to prevent private and public sectors from purchasing offsets as a way to escape their net-zero obligations. Safe to say, I am in favour of strict regulation of public and private entities to ensure that Canadians can have a safe and green future.

As the member of parliament for Oakville, I will fully support government financing of green transition/clean energy initiatives. It is obvious to me that this is the most important problem facing our generation, and the generations of our children - this means that we need to be bold, and take extraordinary action to ensure a cleaner future. If this means making green energy the number one budget priority, then it is a necessary element of the fight against climate change in Canada. We have already committed more funds to green initiatives in our platform than any other major party in this election; all of this will be directed through multi-year sectoral carbon budgets as a framework for appropriate government action.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

We think that the transition to renewable energy is itself a positive consequence, both for ecological and individual health. We also think it is financially less expensive. However our institutions have trouble with long-term planning and also tend to focus on the loudest and most powerful voices. Historically this has led to skewed priorities and market imbalances. Therefore measures such as carbon pricing are one way to rebalance our priorities and focus again on the long-term and away from the loudest voices. Other measures such as carbon conditionality clauses (in order to receive federal funding one must undertake to reduce carbon output in one's activities) will help rebalance our priorities as well.


Oakville-North Burlington

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. Myself and the NDP are unequivocally in favour of ending all fossil fuel subsidies and redirecting these funds to low-carbon initiatives, thereby fulfilling our G-20 commitment. Additionally, we will ensure that future governments cannot reverse this by putting in place legislation to ban any future oil, gas, and pipeline subsidies.

Pam Damoff; Liberal

Our Liberal government put a price on pollution, while putting more money in the pockets of hardworking families through the Climate Action Incentive rebate. This legislation included a federal backstop to ensure that all provinces and territories took action against climate change. In May 2021, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed that our carbon pricing system, including the requirement for provinces to participate, is constitutional. We all must participate in the national effort to fight climate change.

We also implemented landmark climate accountability legislation to hold future governments to account on taking climate action, toward a carbon neutral economy by 2050. This also puts us on par with world leaders. The Canadian Net-Zero Emissions Accountability Act calls on the Minister of the Environment to set targets at 5-year intervals, at least 10 years in advance, for 2030, 2035, 2040 and 2045, in order to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The targets must take into account the best scientific information available, Canada’s international commitments with respect to climate change, Indigenous knowledge, and submissions and advice from the Net-Zero Advisory Body. In the last session of the house, I was proud to contribute to several amendments passed, including that all future governments will have to take into account the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the advice provided by the Net-Zero Advisory Body when establishing a plan. They must also deliver progress and assessment reports on their targets. These are important steps for climate change accountability.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

In 2020, we worked with other parties to enshrine into law Canada’s commitment to reach net-zero by 2050, binding future governments to continue on that path. I believe that Canada’s oil and gas workers need to see a place for themselves in that future, which is why I’m happy

that the Liberal platform contains a pledge to move forward with Just Transition legislation. To make sure that such legislation is a right fit for those affected, the Liberal Party is committed to seeking guidance from workers, unions, Indigenous peoples, affected communities, and provincial and territorial governments.

Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party


Question 4

Because transferring rapidly from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy will require large scale investment by the federal government during the next decade,

Are you in favour of making the financing of the developments that will be necessary, the federal government’s number one budget priority?

Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Party

Yes, absolutely, there is no question about this.


Emily Brown; Conservative Party

Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

I'm not sure if it should be the number one priority, but it should definitely be a high priority. Personally I believe we need a Universal Basic Income to allow workers the mobility needed to transition into a green economy, so getting that implemented would be my top choice for the budget.


Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam VanKoeverden; Liberal Party

Yes, I am in favour of making all the necessary investments to fight climate change and keep the transfer from a carbon-energized economy to a renewable-energized economy a top priority. Climate change is real and Canadians want real action to fight it. Our government has made serious investments in the steel industry to help reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by large amounts. These investments need to be made across the board.

We put in place Canada’s first-ever climate plan, a plan that has grown more ambitious every year. Together, we’ve assembled the building blocks for a safe, healthy, and prosperous net-zero emissions future. We cannot let climate action rollback. We need to move forward with an even more ambitious plan to tackle climate change, one that seizes the opportunities of the green economy and positions Canada for long-term economic growth, in every province and territory.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

As the member of parliament for Oakville, I will fully support government financing of green transition/clean energy initiatives. It is obvious to me that this is the most important problem facing our generation, and the generations of our children - this means that we need to be bold, and take extraordinary action to ensure a cleaner future. If this means making green energy the number one budget priority, then it is a necessary element of the fight against climate change in Canada. We have already committed more funds to green initiatives in our platform than any other major party in this election; all of this will be directed through multi-year sectoral carbon budgets as a framework for appropriate government action.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

Yes


Oakville-North Burlington:

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. We fully recognize that we are in a climate emergency, and we have to act fully and immediately to prevent catastrophe. Our plan for significant extensive and ambitious federal investments in clean energy, climate resilience, green infrastructure, and energy efficiency across the country demonstrates that this is one of our absolute top budget priorities. Additionally, we have ensured that many of our investments in other areas (such as those to increase affordability or restart our economy to recover from COVID-19) also work to tackle the climate crisis.

Pam Damoff; Liberal

During the 2015 and 2019 Federal Elections, the Liberal Party of Canada ran on a platform to protect the environment while strengthening the economy. Again, in 2021, we are committing to build on our accomplishments of the last six years and keep moving forward on the fight against climate change. Since 2015, our government has invested well over $60 billion to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, invest in development of clean technologies, while helping Canadians and communities adapt to a changing climate.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

Since forming government in 2015, the Liberal Party has invested more than $100 billion towards climate action and clean growth. I certainly support the Liberal Party continuing to invest in transforming Canada’s economy to one that is more fair and more sustainable, and its past history of doing so gives me confidence that it will continue to be a top priority if re-elected.

Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party

Question 5

Because the transition from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy will mean the dislocation of many employees,

Are you in favour of the establishment of an on-going federal Commission to promote the support, training and placement of those who have lost their jobs, so that they are enabled to enter into new kinds of employment in the new economy?



Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Party

Yes. Workers in the resource and extraction economies deserve the same safety nets and support as the rest of us, and the Green Party is in favour of a just transition of these workers including retraining, placement and a Guaranteed Livable Income.


Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

Yes, absolutely. I don't want to see people who went into the fossil fuel industry left behind.

Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam VanKoeverden; Liberal Party

The transition to clean energy needs to be one that is just and equitable. Canadians who work in the carbon-intensive sector must be supported and trained to transition to new kinds of employment in a renewable energized economy. A re-elected Liberal government will move forward with Just Transition Legislation, guided by the feedback we receive from workers, unions, Indigenous peoples, communities, and provinces and territories. We will launch a Clean Jobs Training Centre to help industrial, skill and trade workers across sectors to transition to new well paying and important work.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

People are at the centre of our campaign - our bold action on climate change also includes plans to ensure that no one is left behind in the transition to green energy. Our plan to create over a million new jobs will involve the creation of many roles surrounding the building of green infrastructure across the country. If there are people who struggle to find employment during a green transition, the NDP is ready to find solutions for these workers and their communities; this involves extending EI benefits, the creation of retraining and job placement services, as well as ensuring that companies retain and redeploy their workers after transition. A commission that supports the training and placement of those who have lost their jobs will naturally be a key part of our plans surrounding this issue.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

Yes


Oakville-North Burlington:

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. Workers are at the front and centre of our climate action plan.

Our plan to create over 1,000,000 good jobs through extensive green infrastructure investments as well as boosting our manufacturing sector will be paired with new access to training and education for the low carbon future and targeted support for impacted workers, families and communities so that the changing economy works for them, and no one is left behind. We will ensure there are new opportunities in every part of the country.

We will also create a new provincially directed Workers Development and Opportunities Fund to expand training options, with dedicated support for workers in transitioning sectors, marginalized workers, and to improve literacy and essential skills. We will also work with labour and industry to make sure that Canadian workers in the auto industry, which has supported millions of families over the generations, have the skills they need to benefit from the adoption of new green technologies and the transition to zero-emissions vehicles.

We will work with labour, employers and provinces to find solutions for workers through dedicated support combining access to expanded EI benefits, re-training and job placement services, ensuring companies retain and redeploy their workers when in transition, and ensuring workers nearing retirement have retirement security, without penalties to their pensions if they retire early.

We will make sure no one is left behind as we move to a zero-carbon economy.

Pam Damoff; Liberal

A green and just transition is essential for Canada, and it will require supports for employment, communities, infrastructure, and more. We are investing in variety of sectors to build a green economy and create good jobs, for example, shifting the automotive sector towards zero-emission vehicles. To help Canada meet its climate goals, a Liberal government will accelerate its 100 percent zero-emission vehicle sales target from 2040 to 2035. And to meet the accelerated zero-emission vehicle sales target, a Liberal government will pursue a combination of investments and regulations in order to transition to a cleaner future. We recognize that the automotive sector is integral to Canada’s economy. A re-elected Liberal government will work to support the industry’s move towards the adoption of zero-emission vehicles. Another key component of our plan is to conserve up to 1 million square kilometres of land and inland waters, not only to fight climate change and address biodiversity loss, but to support thousands of hard-working Canadians with well-paying jobs in sectors that depend on nature, like tourism, forestry, and agri-food. A Liberal government will also establish a Natural Infrastructure Fund to support natural and hybrid infrastructure projects, mitigate the impacts of climate change, and prevent costly natural events like wildfires and floods.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

Since forming government in 2015, the Liberal Party has invested more than $100 billion towards climate action and clean growth. I certainly support the Liberal Party continuing to invest in transforming Canada’s economy to one that is more fair and more sustainable, and its past history of doing so gives me confidence that it will continue to be a top priority if re-elected.

Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party

Question 6

Because of historic political, social, legal and financial inequities experienced by Indigenous peoples,

Are you in favour of ensuring that there is input from Indigenous Peoples, within the framework of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, in decision making regarding the transformation from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy?



Burlington:

Christian Cullis; Green Party

Yes. as we have seen in British Columbia with the Fairy Creek old growth logging concern, the many times companies and the federal government have tried to push through pipelines and industry in recognized Indigenous lands, and a countless number of large and small examples of corporate and government decisions that purposely try to bypass and minimize Indigenous voices in their own communities, colonialism remains alive and well today in Canada. UNDRIP is a strong framework for centering Indigenous voices in these decisions, and the Green Party and I are very much in support of its implementation here


Karina Gould; Liberal Party

Nick Page; NDP

Yes, the NDP is committed to implementing all 94 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 94 Calls to Action. It is important for us to allow Indigenous people to have not just input but free informed consent on any plans that impact them or their land.


Michael Bator; People's Party


Milton:

Adam VanKoeverden; Liberal Party

Yes, a re-elected Liberal government will ensure that there is input from Indigenous Peoples in the decision making regarding the transformation from a carbon energized to a renewable energized economy. We will create a Low-Carbon Building Materials Innovation Hub to work directly with entrepreneurs, municipalities, provinces and territories, and Indigenous governments to ensure Canadian innovations are best positioned to succeed.

We will establish a $2 billion Futures Fund for Alberta, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador that will be designed in collaboration with local workers, unions, educational institutions, environmental groups, investors, and Indigenous peoples who know their communities best. We will support local and regional economic diversification and specific place-based strategies.

We will move forward with Just Transition Legislation, guided by the feedback we receive from workers, unions, Indigenous peoples, communities, and provinces and territories. Finally, we will partner with post-secondary institutions and Indigenous organizations to accelerate the creation and growth of Indigenous clean technology businesses.

Chris Kowalchuk; Green Party

Nadeem Akbar; Conservative Party

Muhammad Riaz Sahi; NDP Party

Shibli Hadad; People's Party


Oakville:

Anita Anand; Liberal Party

Jerome Adamo; NDP Party

The stewardship and traditional knowledge of Canada’s First Nations peoples should be a guiding factor in our transition to green energy and a cleaner future. As the original carers for this land, all Canadians will benefit from the involvement of indigenous peoples in decision making regarding the green transformation. The creation of the Indigenous Guardians Program will involve indigenous peoples in decision making, and will also combine traditional first nations knowledge of stewardship with training in modern climate science, to be used as a reactionary force to counter natural/climate change driven disasters. The NDP will always value first nations peoples and their relationship with the land - we look forward to a functional and cooperative relationship in regards to the creation of a cleaner future.

Kerry Colborne; Conservative Party

J D Meany; People's Party

Oriana Knox; Green Party

Yes. The Drawdown book recommends that Indigenous peoples' land management – that is, actively working with various Indigenous groups to manage land, up to and including transferring ownership – will reduce CO2 output by 6.9 Gt by 2050. So not only is this a socially just outcome, it's also an ecologically wiser one.

Oakville-North Burlington:

Bruno Sousa; Green Party

Gilbert Jubinville; People's Party

Hanan Rizkalla; Conservative Party

Lenaee Dupuis; NDP Party

Yes. Myself and all New Democrats have committed to building reconciliation into the heart of our plan to address the climate emergency, ensuring First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples are full and equal partners in Canada’s efforts to confront it. We recognize that Indigenous peoples are best placed to protect cultural and biological diversity through control over their territory. We also recognize that the climate crisis threatens food sources and the very survival of many Indigenous communities.

We will:

- Uphold Indigenous rights to protect land, waterways and biodiversity, uphold Indigenous knowledge and respect inherent sovereignty;

- Encourage energy sustainability in remote communities and equity opportunities for renewable energy projects;

- Ensure Indigenous people, as the original peoples and stewards of their territories, a seat at high-level decision-making tables to confront the climate crisis;

- Ensure that climate investments are directed towards reducing inequality, honouring Indigenous rights and supporting communities that have been left behind;

- Create an Office of Environmental Justice to address the disproportionate impacts of pollution and loss of biodiversity on Indigenous, low-income, racialized, and other marginalized communities;

- Support Indigenous-led nature conservation and land-use and climate planning, including by expanding the Indigenous Guardians Program, invest in Indigenous-led science and support the creation of Indigenous-managed protected areas;

- Work jointly with Indigenous leadership and communities to develop a National Crisis Strategy and coordinated action plans to plan, adapt, cope safely, and respond to climate change emergencies and extreme weather events, informed by Indigenous traditional and ecological knowledge and legal systems;

- Replace mere consultation with a standard of free, prior and informed consent for Indigenous communities affected by government policies;

- Support the creation and expansion of Indigenous Protected and Conserved areas in all areas of the country.

Pam Damoff; Liberal

Yes I am in favour, as respect and recognition of Indigenous rights is essential. In June 2021, the Liberal government passed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) following extensive, distinctions-based consultation and input from Indigenous partners. As a member of the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Committee, I was a part of the review of this legislation. I heard testimony from the leaders of the national Indigenous organizations, Indigenous women’s organizations, and grassroots groups, about the importance of UNDRIP.

We have also made investments across government to support Indigenous communities in addressing climate change. The Liberal government committed $1.4 billion over five years for health care services for First Nations and Inuit and to respond to the health impacts of climate change. In Budget 2021, we invested $138 million in Canada’s Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund to help Indigenous communities adapt to climate change. We also committed $22.7 million over 5 years to support Indigenous communities as they manage the health impacts of climate change, and $36 million over 3 years through the Strategic Partnerships Initiative to build capacity for clean energy projects. A re-elected Liberal government will continue to support Indigenous communities to manage the health impacts of climate change, such as access to food, impacts of extreme weather events, and mental health impacts of climate change on youth.


Wellington-Halton Hills:

Melanie Lang; Liberal Party

Indigenous people participate in Canada’s current fossil fuel sectors, and we have a duty to ensure they aren’t left behind as we transition to renewables. The Liberal government passed legislation to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and a re-elected Liberal government would require cabinet members to implement the declaration and work with Indigenous people as part of their mandate letters. We also commit to involving and consulting with Indigenous people when drawing up planned Just Transition legislation.

Michael Chong; Conservative Party

Noor Jahangir; NDP Party

Ran Zhu; Green Party

Sylvain Carle; People's Party